The Simpsons

The Simpsons aired its 300th episode on Sunday, February 16, 2003. The episode, titled Barting Over, was a definite comment on our times. In the show, Bart discovers he starred in commercials as a baby, and Homer spent every dime he earned. In true Simpsons form, Bart divorces Homer and Marge.

Now that Fox has contracted The Simpsons for two more seasons, the show is destined to become television’s longest-running sitcom. There are many happenings to celebrate this rare landmark. Check out the following merchandise to join the festivities.

The TV series The Simpsons has been on TV since 1987, and was taken in by FOX after the Tracy Ullman run of the show. The characters were altered over the years, from their shapes to their colors. Season 1 recognized the family as 5 people who can’t get along but are trapped with each other. Over the years, we’ve seen them work together, but not all the time. Whether Homer’s choking Bart, or Bart’s teasing Lisa, they can’t and don’t always get along. Season after season, more and more characters were developed, from Homer’s mom to Krusty’s daughter. These characters, along with many others, were only temporary. Many characters have also died. On The Simpsons, there are main characters (Homer, Bart, Marge, Lisa), middle characters (Moe, Barney, Mr. Burns, Smithers) and more rare characters (Agnes Skinner, Miss Hoover, Manjula).

The Simpsons looks have been altered, as stated above. The newer the episodes get, the darker, fresher yellow their skin is. Plus, they sound much more clear and more “Simpsonish.” But why the yellow skin? Matt Groening wanted an unusual appearance, like Marge’s hair for example, how it’s tall & blue.

Cardew Teapots

Cardew Disney Teapots by Paul Cardew. Their can be no doubt that Paul Cardew’s Disney Showcase Teapots are among the most beautiful in the world, but don’t just take them at face value. Only the finest clay, underglaze and lustres make it into the posession of Cardew Teapots handcraft production team, who use age-old skills to create their fine products.

They even apply real gold and platinum to many of their Limited Edition designs, either in the form of transfers or lustres, sometimes both.

We are proud to be an Authorized Dealer of Cardew Teapots, whose Teapots are featured at Disneyland and at Disney Galleries.

The Cardew ‘Disney Showcase Collection’ is truly a star studded show and was always destined to be just that when Paul’s ceramic animating techniques met up with Disney’s animated heroes.

The result is a magnificent collection of designs which vary from giftware prices through to very prestigious collectible masterpieces like “Pooh’s Birthday Cake”, and this years “Rhapsody in Pooh”.

Each design is limited in number or by production year.

Betty Boop

Find your favorite Betty Boop merchandise. Betty Boop just wants to be loved by you, and nobody else but you! It’s been over 70 years since Betty Boop’s 1930 debut in the cartoon called “Dizzy Dishes.” But time means nothing to a diva like Betty Boop. Betty Boop’s innocence still dazzles her public. She has always been a modern woman with great wit and an even better figure. Who says blondes have more fun? With her loyal dog companions Bimbo and Pudgy by her side, Betty Boop’s escapades have led to a very enthusiastic following of fans whose ages range from 4 to 90 years old.

Betty was created by Grim Natwick who said, “I had a song sheet of Helen Kane, and the spit curls came from her. So I just designed a little dog and put cute feminine legs on her, and the earrings, which developed later, started out as long ears. I suppose I used a French poodle for the basic idea of the character.” Grim Natwick’s other claim to fame was that he created and animated most of Snow White for Disney.

The voice of Betty Boop was done by several women, including Margie Heinz, Kate Wright and Bonnie Poe, but Little Ann Little and Mae Questel were the most important. Little Ann Little did the voice first and then went on the road with a Betty Boop act. The act consisted, in part, of a drawing demonstration by Pauline Comanor, who drew Ann as Betty Boop and handed out the drawings to lucky audience members. Mae Questel did the voice until the series ended in 1939. She was quite adept at mimicry and could imitate anyone. She also, like Ann, bore a striking resemblance to Betty.

Cow Parade Figurines

Cow Parade is a unique art exhibit, that is being featured in many cities. Cow Parade consists of life-sized fiberglass cows painted and decorated by professional and amateur artists. The Cow Parade exhibit is made possible by combined efforts of the city sponsoring the Cow Parade, the local art community and corporate sponsorships for each Cow Parade design.

These figurines have captured the essence of the original images in smaller replicas. The craze is sweeping the nation with many stores blowing out of stock in just a couple of days.

The cows ultimately benefit charity. At the conclusion of each event, the cows are herded up and many are auctioned, with a substantial portion of the proceeds benefiting charity. The Chicago auction raised an amazing $3,000,000.00 for charity, including $1.4 million on-line and $2.1 million at the live auction assisted by Sotheby’s.

The average bid price on the 140 cows was nearly $25,000, with the top pick, HANDsome, selling for $110,000. The CowParade New York 2000 Charity Auction raised an equally impressive $1,351,000.00 benefiting several New York City charities. The highest winning bid was $60,000, for Tiffany. The average bid was $18,257.

CowParade continues to evolve, not just in size, but in creativity and quality of art. While the sculptures remain the same, each city’s artists are challenged by the art from past events, inspired by the cultural influences of their respective cities.

CowParade is not meant to be high art, however. It is first and foremost a public art exhibit that is accessible to everyone.